C MORE HOLOGRAPHIC SIGHT

The C More Tactical Rail holographic sight is large enough to be used on rifles, but will also function on handguns.

The C More Tactical Rail holographic sight is large enough to be used on rifles, but will also function on handguns.

The C More holo-sight system is more heavy-duty than the Burris Fastfire – but also larger and heavier. There are polymer and aluminum frame models available for a “slide ride” mount or rail mount. I chose the rail mount for my .460 Rowland, which had already destroyed a budget priced holo sight – even when rail mounted. For a lesser caliber, C More makes a 1911 dovetail mount for mounting on the slide (but for a smaller caliber, I would probably go with smaller and less expensive Burris mini-holo sight).

The model I am testing has a brightness adjustment knob for precise control, and there is a model that “clicks” as adjustments are made. This is a very sturdy sight, and should hold up to a lot of recoil – for a long time. C Mores are very popular with competition shooters, probably for good reason. The dot projection is clear and precise, and the sight picture very easy to obtain. It adds enough weight to my 1911, along with the comped Clark .460 Rowland barrel, that steady offhand shooting is more difficult, but for big game hunting, a rest should be taken where possible, anyway.

The C More is more expensive than the Burris, but not excessively so. Retailers like Amazon sell them considerably discounted from MSRP.

C MORE TACTICAL RAIL SIGHT UPDATE

This category is titled, “product Evaluations”, and a product does not always evaluate well for the purpose it is evaluated for – which is not always the fault of the product, but rather the person selecting it for a specific use. I noted from the start that this sight was rather large for a pistol, but I took a chance on it because I needed something sturdy for the .460 Rowland. After a quick test, the mount I was using did not inspire confidence, so I made the decision to try something else on the Rowland, which left me with money invested in the first sight that I probably would not recover if I chose to put it up for sale. As I still felt the C More Rail Sight was a good one, I found a sort of unique use for it. I have a 16″ Thompson Contender barrel chambered for .45LC/.410 for which I have a carbine stock – legal with a 16″ barrel. I may eventually choose to put a suppressor on this barrel, as the .45 LC can be loaded to power levels equal to a .44 magnum, so it should also be able to perform as well at sub sonic speeds with large bullets on game. I would also like to be able to occasionally use this barrel in pistol configuration, which makes sighting a challenge. A pistol scope would not work with on a carbine length stock unless mounted out on the barrel, “scout” rifle style, nor would a rifle scope work on a pistol, so it would have to be re-sighted when stocks were changed. If I mounted the C More sight on it, however, this might not be the case. A holographic sight has unlimited eye relief, and no parallex, so hopefully it would retain the same zero regardless of the distance from my eye changing with stock changes.

Also, the .45LC Contenders are not known for great accuracy, because the chambers are cut “loose” for the 3″ .410 shells. Because of this, the gun may be used as much as a handy shotgun for squirrel hunting and pest control – for which use the holo sight should be better than a scope. I think this will be an interesting evaluation, so stick with me and maybe we’ll all learn something.

After being found lacking as a pistol sight due to size and weight, the C More Rail sight was moved to this 16" barreled Contender .45LC/.410.

After being found lacking as a pistol sight due to size and weight, the C More Rail sight was moved to this 16″ barreled Contender .45LC/.410.

About MikeH

Texas hunter and fisherman for 50 years, published outdoor writer since 1979, licensed charter boat operator from 1982 to 2013. Past Member, Board of Directors, National Association of Charterboat Operators, current member Environmental Advisory Committee to the DOE and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Married to Dorothy since 2000, one son, Michael who is recently married and living in Nederland, Texas. My wife and I live in Oyster Creek, Texas, near Freeport, and have a hunting property outside of Brazoria, Texas.
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