BIRD “SELFIE”?

For some reason, all the cardinals – redbirds – on my property that usually follow me as I spread corn around feeder spots have disappeared. This seems to happen at least once a year, and not always at the same time of year. This female cardinal appears to have decided to leave a game camera “selfie” picture before joining the others of her kind where ever they have gone on vacation.

Females!

/Users/mikeholmes/Pictures/iPhoto Library/Modified/2010/Mar 26, 2010/photo.JPG

Posted in Picture Of The Week | Comments Off on BIRD “SELFIE”?

BUCKS HAVE GONE NOCTURNAL. IS THE RUT STARTING?

Where a few weeks ago, this buck was prowling in daylight, with deer season imminent, he has gone nocturnal.

Where a few weeks ago, this buck was prowling in daylight, with deer season imminent, he has gone nocturnal.

A few weeks ago I was still getting trail cam pictures of bucks moving and feeding in daylight hours. Many times I would “see” more than one large racked buck in the same picture. In the last week, however, bucks on my property seem to have gone mostly nocturnal.

Good news to go with that is from the look on the back leg scent glands, the rut is either started or very close. Hopefully this will mean bucks chasing does in the daytime for opening weekend of the season – coming up.

Posted in Deer Hunting | 2 Comments

BELT MOUNTAIN REPLACEMENT BASE PIN FOR RUGER REVOLVERS

Belt Mountain base pins add a different look to the Ruger SBH, but also have sound mechanical advantages over the stock Ruger pin.

Belt Mountain base pins add a different look to the Ruger SBH, but also have sound mechanical advantages over the stock Ruger pin.

If you own a Ruger Super Blackhawk single action revolver, the Belt Mountain replacement base pin is a solution to a problem you may not have. My first .44 magnum revolver was an old single action imported by Herter’s, with a 4″ barrel. The thing kicked like the proverbial mule, and I generally had to take a screwdriver and check all the fasteners after each session of shooting. I finally gave up on it when the cylinder base pin began to “shoot loose” with regularity. This pin didn’t just pull a little out of place – it would shoot off the gun and land several feet away, finally becoming lost forever in the brush. While I have never had such a situation with a Ruger, evidently it is common enough for Belt Mountain to devise a fix for the problem. Their replacement pin has a tighter fit and a better notch for the base pin latch to catch in. For even more insurance that your pin does not work loose under recoil and try to back out, they offer a heavy duty locking base pin, with a set screw that tightens against the barrel. The pins may be had in a standard style in locking or non-locking, a knurled locking, and one that revives the look of the Elmer Keith #5 revolver. I chose the knurled locking style for my revolver, as the knurled end looked as though it would provide a better grip when removing the pin.

The Belt Mountain pin is certainly affordable, and can probably be installed by the majority of revolver owners. This is fortunate, because the instructions than come with the pin have no illustrations to guide the user through the installation. To that end, here are some photos that I think should help.

If you have even a basic knowledge of the single action revolver, you should know how to remove the cylinder. This is done by fully retracting the cylinder base pin and lifting the cylinder out of the action on the right hand side, with the loading gate open.

Depress the base pin latch fully and retract the pin as far as it will go to release the cylinder. Open the loading gate and remove the cylinder from that side.

Depress the base pin latch fully and retract the pin as far as it will go to release the cylinder. Open the loading gate and remove the cylinder from that side.

Before going any further, push the new base pin through the cylinder to insure it fits. There should be no binding, and the cylinder should spin freely on the pin.

Before going any further, push the new base pin through the cylinder to insure it fits. There should be no binding, and the cylinder should spin freely on the pin.

Next, check the fit of the new pin by inserting it in the frame.Again, the fit should be tight, and the pin should push against the transfer bar. Check the Belt Mountain Instructions and the Ruger manual for further details on this.

Insert the new base pin through the frame all the way to it's final resting place against the firing pin transfer bar.

Insert the new base pin through the frame all the way to it’s final resting place against the firing pin transfer bar.

The ejector pin and spring are in a housing screwed to the muzzle end of the barrel, with the screw on the right hand side as you look down the barrel from front sight to the muzzle. Remove the screw while holding the ejector housing close to the barrel. The screw should stay in the housing with minimal pressure. With the ejector rod out of the way, the “old” base pin can easily be removed.

To remove the original base pin from the frame, the ejector rod, spring, and housing must be removed.

To remove the original base pin from the frame, the ejector rod, spring, and housing must be removed.

Next, replace the cylinder in the frame and push the base pin in place to hold it there. With the original pin, I often had to do some wriggling to get this done, and since the Belt Mountain in had a tighter fit, you may have to wiggle it around even more.

After replacing the cylinder and intalling the new base pin, check that the base pin latch holds it securely in the proper position, then tighten the set screw in the base pin against the barrel to  "lock" it in place.

After replacing the cylinder and intalling the new base pin, check that the base pin latch holds it securely in the proper position, then tighten the set screw in the base pin against the barrel using the supplied allen wrench “lock” it in place.

A word about the little “wrench” that tightens the base pin against the barrel, you will also need to use this to remove the base pin, so keep it handy! I found that the next to smallest wrench on my Leupold scope adjustment tool fits this set screw, and I can find it a lot easier.

This small wrench in my Leupold scope adjustment tool fits the base pin lock.

This small wrench in my Leupold scope adjustment tool fits the base pin lock.

While I was not anticipating a need for the Belt Mountain pin to keep my base pin from shooting loose in the Ruger, I had hoped the tighter pin would help with my other cylinder “problem”. It did not, but does make me feel the system is maybe stronger. more secure, and definitely looks a little better to those who notice such small things. By the way, Belt Mountain does not recommend their pin for folks like me. They advise only purchasing one if it is really needed to keep the cylinder in place. Still, with both of my Ruger revolvers, the base pin had enough forward-backward play that it could be pushed in a bit farther after supposedly locked in place with the factory set-up. The Belt Mountain locking pin eliminates this. Reading reviews on the internet of this product has shown that at least some Ruger owners have had their stock pins pull forward under recoil, if not all the way out of position, at least far enough to prevent the revolver from firing. While even Belt Mountain suggests only using their product if you really need it, many Ruger owners automatically install them in all their revolvers, and even custom revolver builders like Hamilton Bowen and Gary Reeder use them as a matter of course in their custom guns.

BELT MOUNTAIN ENTERPRISES INC.
P.O. Box 353
Belgrade, MT 59714
(406) 388 – 1396
www.beltmountain.com

Posted in Uncategorized | 5 Comments

CONGRESSIONAL SPORTSMAN’S CAUCUS ON AMENDMENT 40

Ed. Note : This is a letter from the CSC to the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries
Management Council in regards to Amendment 40 and Sector Separation.

October 20, 2014
Kevin Anson, Chairman Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council 2203 North Louis Avenue Suite 1100 Tampa, Florida 33607

RE: Reef Fish Amendment 40 – Sector Separation for the Recreational Red Snapper Fishery

Dear Chairman Anson:

As leaders and members of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus (CSC), we are writing today to express our concerns regarding the Gulf Council’s (Council) fast track of Amendment 40, also known as “sector separation”. The CSC was founded in 1989 to provide a voice for America’s sportsmen and women on Capitol Hill. It’s the largest and most effective bipartisan caucus in Washington, D.C., with nearly 300 members representing 49 states.
The suddenly accelerated speed at which the Council seeks to subdivide the recreational red snapper fishery into two individual components or “sectors” is unacceptable for an action that will likely have far reaching impacts on local communities, the economy, state-based conservation funding, thousands of recreational anglers, and ultimately the charter/for-hire industry for which it is meant to help. A decision of this magnitude requires careful deliberation and calculated safeguards to ensure that the best interest of the American public is first and foremost. Furthermore, there are several concerns regarding potential statutory violations that must be fully explored and resolved before moving forward with any such fundamental change to the interpretation of the Magnuson-Stevens Act and the way we manage marine recreational fisheries in the United States. We fear thorough analysis of these concerns has not been sufficiently undertaken by NOAA Fisheries or the Council relative to Amendment 40.
It is difficult to understand why red snapper management is so unique that it requires such a radical departure from methods that have successfully managed the vast majority of our fish and terrestrial wildlife resources. Indications are that the red snapper stock is recovering well ahead of schedule, which suggests that the current problems with red snapper are not biological, but rather man-made. It appears that some failure of our federal fisheries policy is producing a system in which access to a healthy fishery resource is being funneled through fewer and fewer entities. Unnecessarily restricting public access to a sustainable resource is an undesirable and untenable result for any wildlife resource management system, and one that should be avoided at all costs.
Fundamentally, we struggle to see where Amendment 40 offers a solution to the challenges facing the recreational sector. For the private recreational component, which represents by far the largest number of recreational red snapper anglers, it virtually ensures few, if any, days to fish in federal waters. While we fully support a better management approach to alleviate the hardships of an extremely short recreational season on the charter/for-hire fishery, providing more days of fishing for a select few while
completely ignoring the impacts to the majority of participants is irresponsible. Other options that address the needs of the recreational fishery as a whole should be on the table.
Finally, the controversy surrounding Amendment 40 and the Council and NOAA Fisheries willingness to move forward without first reaching consensus among the affected stakeholders, or even within the Council’s own reef fish committee, presents a more pressing question as to the Council’s ability to effectively manage the nation’s fishery resources in the Gulf of Mexico. The fishery management councils were entrusted by Congress to find a balance between the needs of our fisheries and the people who participate in the fisheries. Striking a fair and equitable balance among the participants of the red snapper fishery is a critical step that is clearly missing from Amendment 40.
As a voice for America’s sportsmen and women across the nation, we urge you to table any further consideration of Amendment 40 until such time as a thorough analysis of the scientific, legal, economic and cultural impacts of sector separation have been completed and alternative management approaches, such as regional management, have been appropriately considered.

Sincerely,

CC: Dr. Roy Crabtree, NMFS Southeast Regional Administrator Doug Gregory, Executive Director, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council

Posted in Conservation/The Environment | Comments Off on CONGRESSIONAL SPORTSMAN’S CAUCUS ON AMENDMENT 40

FLOWER GARDENS DOCUMENTARY TO BE ON TV

Window in the Waves Airs in Houston this Week

Window in the Waves, the story of the Flower Garden Banks, is a documentary by Todd Richard of Synergy Productions.

The first Houston showing of Window in the Waves will be on Wednesday, October 22, 2014 at 7 p.m. on KUHT TV 8 Houston Public Media. The documentary will repeat Friday, October 24 at 1:30 a.m. and Saturday, October 25 at 4:30 p.m.

“It’s really interesting that so many Texas residents aren’t aware of these world-class coral reefs. They’re in our backyard and thrive in the middle of one of the busiest oil and gas production areas on earth. Window in the Waves allows us to learn and care about a miraculous place that is like no other in the world,” Richard shared.

The 2014 Blue Ocean International Film Competition named Richard and Window in the Waves as a finalist in the Emerging Filmmaker category. The documentary also received an honorable mention in the Cinematography category.
http://flowergarden.noaa.gov

Posted in Conservation/The Environment | 3 Comments

BADGER CUSTOM GRIPS FOR THE RUGER BLACKHAWKS

The easiest, most cost efficient way to add a “custom” look and feel to your Ruger or other quality single action revolver is to put new grips on it – whether the gun be new or old. Factory Ruger grips come from an aftermarket supplier, and while some look very good, others are not so good. In my quest to find the perfect grips for my new Ruger Super Blackhawk, I turned to Badger Custom Grips. Badger offers several styles, from factory-like to models with checkering and some with finger grips – and in Walnut, Rosewood, or an attractive Black and Silver laminate.

These Rosewood grips from Badger Custom Grips are a better fit than the factor standard grips, and both sides "match" as far as color and grain.

These Rosewood grips from Badger Custom Grips are a better fit than the factor standard grips, and both sides “match” as far as color and grain.

I chose the Rosewood grips, and I think they are very attractive. Not as dark as the factory grips on my gun, the grain pattern shows up much better, and color overall is nicer.

The other side of the Ruger with badger grips in place. Note absence of grip screw hole and/or Ruger emblem.

The other side of the Ruger with badger grips in place. Note absence of grip screw hole and/or Ruger emblem.

One feature I especially like about the Badger grips is that there is no screw hole showing on the left side. Instead, there is a small threaded plate fitted into the back side of the grip to catch the screw. This gives them the custom look of a one-piece grip. Also, the Ruger emblems are missing. Brand loyalty is great, but the grips without the emblems further the custom look, and will not hurt your palm with strong loads as the original grips might. The finish is smooth and high gloss, but does not slip in the palm any more than the factory grips might – just enough to let the gun “rotate” up in your hand after firing, which reduces the effect of recoil somewhat.

The over all fit of these grip panels was excellent, and in my opinion they are a very good value for the price. Badger is willing to help you find just the right grips, and they certainly were patient and helpful with me.

To look at other Badger offerings, or order a set for yourself, call Dave at 864/608-0032, email him at david@badgercustomgrips.com, or visit their website: badgercustongrips.com.

Be sure and tell him I sent you.

Posted in Rifles and Other Things That Go Bang! | Comments Off on BADGER CUSTOM GRIPS FOR THE RUGER BLACKHAWKS

POOR BABY!

This youngster looks like he/she could use a rest and some good meals?

This youngster looks like he/she could use a rest and some good meals?

This baby needs some help, maybe, but I hope it will be a case of nature taking care of its own.

Posted in Picture Of The Week | Comments Off on POOR BABY!

BRAZORIA LIONS CLUB ANNUAL GUN RAFFLE

October 15, 2014

For immediate release. Please announce the following event:

Brazoria Lions Club Takes Aim on Annual Gun Raffle

The Brazoria Lions Club will hold its annual gun raffle (99 long guns and a Polaris 4-wheeler) culminating with the drawing on Thursday, December 11 beginning with a social at 6 p.m. at the Brazoria Heritage Foundation Lloyd Thomas Gymnasium (Hwy. 36 at Smith Street) in Brazoria.

Raffle tickets are $20.00 a piece and can be bought from any Brazoria Lions Club member. Only 3,500 tickets will be sold. Tickets are available at Davis Tire & Auto, The Car Store, The Used Car Factory and The T-Shirt Shop in Brazoria. Tickets will also be sold at the times shown at the following locations:

– Most Wednesdays until the event at the Walmart in Lake Jackson from 10:00 a.m. – 600 p.m.

– Most Thursdays until the event at the Food King in Lake Jackson from 3:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

– Most Thursdays until the event at Stewart’s in Brazoria from 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

– Most Fridays until the event at McCoy’s in Brazoria from 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

– Most Thursdays (from 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.) and Saturdays (from 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.) until the event at Brazos Mall in front of Texas Road House

– Most Fridays until the event at Bernard Grocery in Churchill from 2:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.

Purchase of a raffle ticket will also entitle the ticket holder to a bar-b-q sandwich, chips and a drink at the drawing December 11. Additional chances to win other prizes will be offered at the event. The prizes are listed on the raffle ticket and all MUST be claimed within 30 days of the drawing. Winners will have choices of calibers and gauges on model drawn on hand – first come, first choice. All gun winners must pass a NCIS background check.

Get your tickets early – they were sold out before Thanksgiving in 2013. Winners need not be present to win. For more information, call: 979-798-4444.

Join your local Lions Club – “We Serve”

http://www.e-clubhouse.org/sites/brazoriatx/ or “Like” us on Facebook

Posted in Rifles and Other Things That Go Bang! | Comments Off on BRAZORIA LIONS CLUB ANNUAL GUN RAFFLE

AN OLDIE, BUT A GOODIE!

My son, Michael, got his Federal Firearms License not long ago, and he tells me that right now is a good time to buy guns – as there are more potential sellers than buyers. Looking on gun selling websites pretty much confirms that, as I am seeing guns offered for sale that were fairly hard to find not that long ago. Among these are good revolvers in hunting calibers, including a good number of Ruger Blackhawks and Super Blackhawks. I have had a yen for a .45 Long Colt revolver for some time now, and recently scratched that itch with a “pre-owned” New Model Blackhawk with a 7 1/2″ barrel. The .45 is one of the few cartridges that made the upgrade from black powder to smokeless and is still a viable option, even in these times when rustlers, stage robbers, and renegade “Native Americans” have pretty much been brought under control.

My .45 had pretty weathered grips when I got it, obviously the ones that came with the gun.

The grips on my used Ruger were original, and shall we say, weathered?

The grips on my used Ruger were original, and shall we say, weathered?

I usually upgrade the grips on any handgun I buy soon after I take possession, and already had several “custom” grip types on order for my Super Blackhawk which wears the same grips as the New Model Blackhawk, I elected to refinish these stocks to “get me by” until some of the new ones came in. Below is a comparison of the older grips after sanding and refinishing with an oil finish to the grip on the “good side” of my new Ruger. The next shots show the .45 grips after refinishing. I think the old grips actually cleaned up nicely, and are an improvement even over the new Ruger grips.

Slightly older Ruger New Model Blackhawk in .45 LC with 6 1/2" barrel compared to new Super Blackhawk .44 mag with 5 1/2" barrel.

Slightly older Ruger New Model Blackhawk in .45 LC with 6 1/2″ barrel compared to new Super Blackhawk .44 mag with 5 1/2″ barrel.

I do not care for open sights on most handguns, and only have 2 1911’s and a .38 revolver with open sights – and the 1911’s wear night sights on one and fiber optics on the other. Although I do not expect to try to play Elmer Keith and shoot long range with my .45, I find it much more precise to aim with a long eye relief pistol scope, and almost as fast to get on target as with a red dot type optic, especially if you can shoot with both eyes open. Accordingly, I mounted My Weaver 2X on this gun, at least for now.

My 2X Weaver long eye relief pistol scope will call the .45 Ruger home for at least a fair trial period.

My 2X Weaver long eye relief pistol scope will call the .45 Ruger home for at least a fair trial period.

Had my first “range test” yesterday, using loads with 300gr Sierra jacketed soft nose bullets with a light charge of Titegroup power that is supposed to yield 700 – 850 fps (depending on barrel length). Did not take the chronograph, and only fired 6 rounds, mostly to insure everything worked correctly. These bullets are listed on the box as .4515 diameter, and .45 Colt specs usually show .452. I have some 300gr Hard Cast bullets on order from Montana Bullet Works, because I have had very good luck with a 335gr cast bullet from them in my suppressed .44. Dave at MBW asked that I measure the actual cylinders, as Ruger has a reputation for making them a bit “off spec” in their .45’s. Five of my cylinders measured close enough to .452 to call them that, the sixth was actually nearer to .4515. My .4515 bullets fit easily through all the cylinders except the smaller diameter one, and they went through that one with slight resistance. Since Hard Cast bullets are a bit softer, overall, than jacketed bullets,this means a .452 cast bullet should work fine. In fact, the .4515 jacketed bullet was fine in that cylinder, also.

Recoil with this charge was less than a full bore .44 mag – or ,45 LC, of course, but due to the weight of the bullet it is still noticeable – but not unpleasant to anyone who shoots .44 mags a lot. My experience with the big hard cast bullets at sub sonic velocities – 1050 – 1100 fps – has shown that big bullets at “slow” speeds penetrate very well on hogs out to at least 75 yards, and I expect most of my shots to be closer to 25 yards, so I will be confident using this load that will be easier on both the revolver and my wrist. If more power is needed, the “old” .45 can deliver it! Modern .45 loads can push past .44 magnum power levels, even closely approach those of the powerful .454 Casull.

For more detail and some load data for the .45 “long Colt”, here is a link to an article by John Linebaugh on his efforts with the .45 that contains considerable praise for the Ruger Blackhawk revolver:

http://www.customsixguns.com/writings/dissolving_the_myth.htm

Be sure to note his recommendations for suitable revolvers to fire stouter .45 loads. Since Ruger does not chamber the Super Blackhawk in .45, I was pleased to note that the standard Blackhawk is considered strong enough for even strong .45 loads. I was surprised at the assertion that the only difference between the two revolvers was that the cylinder of the SBH was stronger and heavier. My super calibrated hunting pistol/sausage scale shows that the .45 Standard Blackhawk weighs just under 3.5 pounds, with the 2X Weaver scope mounted and a 7.5″ barrel. The .44 mag Super Blackhawk with the same mount as the BH and a scope of similar weight on a 5 1/2″ barrel gives a reading of 4.25 pounds – and feels obviously heavier. (These are unloaded weights) I suspect maybe the BH has an aluminum grip frame, while the SBH is steel), and the hammer on the SBH is larger and of a shape that looks almost like a compromise between the standard hammer and a Bisley hammer. I am going to shoot 300gr Hard Cast bullets in my BH .45, at probably under 1000 fps, for less recoil and longer gun life – maybe later on I’ll invest in a “stronger” revolver to try to use the .45 cartridge towards its true potential.

As with the Ruger .44 mag I shot last week, it was very easy to “get on paper” with this revolver and load at close range. I was pleased with the few shots I made offhand, and expect the actual sighting in from my rest will go very well. Realistically, at the close range I was shooting, the first 3 shots would have killed a hog, if aimed in the right spot. I continue to be pleased with the Weaver 301 base mount for Ruger Blackhawks. It is easy to install and mount a scope with this base and Weaver type rings, and it is very secure, None of the shooting I’ve done so far has worked anything loose – although a bunch of hot loaded rounds might do that eventually. I also wanted to make sure the sort of cylinder latch problems I have found with my new Ruger SBH did not appear after mounting this base and scope and shooting it. Whether for good or bad, this is not the case. The older Ruger is still tight as a bank vault, so the mount is evidently not the problem with the newer Ruger either.

Hope to get back out and finish fine tuning the sighting on both of these Ruger “big bores” soon – and get some shots at hogs soon after that. Bore sighted with my old BSA optical type instrument this morning, so should be an easy process to finish.

Another “old-timer” gets back in the game!

My "new-old" Ruger Super Blackhawk with 7 1/2" barrel compared to The "regular" New Model Blackhawk of the same length.

My “new-old” Ruger Super Blackhawk with 7 1/2″ barrel compared to The “regular” New Model Blackhawk of the same length.

While still having problems with new production Ruger SBH’s, I found thus “well-used” SBH with 7 1/2″ barrel in .44 magnum for what I considered a very good price. It showed neglect in the form of some surface rust – even had “dust bunnies” in the chambers! On the other hand, it wears a set of Pachmeyer wrap-around recoil absorbing rubber grips. This model SBH has an unfluted cylinder – which I prefer if only for looks – and the squared off back edge of the trigger guard which some complain hurts fingers, and thus is covered by the rubber grip. This gun is massive, even compared to the standard Blackhawk, which is a substantial gun itself. In contrast to the cylinder movement problems I found with my recent “new” SBH, this one locks up tight and solid, function is perfect so far. I hope to make this into a “mild” custom, with a new finish, wood grips, and a few other touches. I do not expect any mechanical changes to be needed, and the timing and trigger are as good as I could hope for – so cosmetic touches are all I plan for now. It already wears a Belt Mountain base pin I had on hand, and I have mounted my T/C 2.5 X 7 variable scope. After quite a bit of oiling, polishing, and a touch with a wire brush most of the surface corrosion is gone, and it could almost look like just “honest” wear that a hunting handgun could be expected to pick up over the years – almost makes me tempted to keep it this way. This is one solid magnum revolver, and makes it obvious why Ruger has built such a reputation of excellence in this field.

Range test to follow, then we’ll wait on the return another the finish job.

Posted in Rifles and Other Things That Go Bang! | Tagged | Comments Off on AN OLDIE, BUT A GOODIE!

RESULTS FOR THE 18TH ANNUAL RIVERS END VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPT. FISHING TOURNAMENT

Submitted on 2014/10/11 at 10:54 am
The cool, clear fall weather brought out families and 169 registered anglers (up from 141 last year and 99 in 2012) at the 18th annual River’s End Volunteer Fire Dept. Fishing Tournament and Fund Raiser. The tournament began at 12:01 a.m., Friday, October 3, and ran through 2 p.m., Sunday, October 5th when final weights were tallied and prizes awarded.
A total of 114 official fish (up from 90 last year, and 101 in 2012) were weighed in over the weekend and (with the exception of Speckled Trout) were generally heavier than last year’s entries. Speckled Trout were hard to find again this year. The final results of the tournament are as follows:
In the Adult Division:
Redfish
1st Place – Chris Hethcock with a fish weighing in at 7.50 lbs.
2nd Place – Warren Knight with a fish weighing in at 7.42 lbs.
3rd Place – Mark LaCroix with a fish weighing in at 7.37 lbs.

Speckled Trout
1st Place – Chris Morton with a fish weighing in at 4.42 lbs.
2nd Place – Ernie Arrington with a fish weighing in at 3.92 lbs.
3rd Place – Bruce Kettler with a fish weighing in at 3.67 lbs.

Flounder
1st Place – Jake Taylor with a fish weighing in at 3.45 lbs.
2nd Place – Jack Reves with a fish weighing in at 3.28 lbs.
3rd Place – Kathy Perkins with a fish weighing in at 2.80 lbs.

Croaker
1st Place – Jim Hethcock with a fish weighing in at 1.54 lbs.
2nd Place – Mark Roese with a fish weighing in at 1.41 lbs.
3rd Place – Billy Jensen with a fish weighing in at 1.4 lbs.

Heaviest Stringer – Roger Friedrichs with a stringer weighing in at 25.62 lbs.

Redfish with the Most Spots – Harold Caudill whose fish had 16 spots
—————————————————————————-
In the Youth Division:

Redfish

1st Place – Jacob Galloway with a fish weighing in at 6.41 lbs.
2nd Place – Alex Lima with a fish weighing in at 6.30 lbs.
3rd Place – Jacob Galloway with a fish weighing in at 5.78 lbs.

Speckled Trout
1st Place – Alex Lima with a fish weighing in at 3.99 lbs.
2nd Place – Kendall Shulte with a fish weighing in at 3.89 lbs.
3rd Place – Jacob Galloway with a fish weighing in at 2.58 lbs.

Flounder
1st Place – Haley Rust with a fish weighing in at 2.00 lbs.
2nd Place – Abby Rust with a fish weighing in at 1.78 lbs.
3rd Place – Alyssa Walker (who was using a “Barbie” fishing pole) with a fish weighing in at 1.76 lbs.
Croaker
1st Place – Nik Irwin with a fish weighing in at 1.34 lbs.
2nd Place – Nik Irwin with a fish weighing in at 1.21 lbs.
3rd Place – Alyssa Walker with a fish weighing in at 1.11 lbs.
Largest Hardhead Catfish – Nik Irwin with a fish weighing in at 1.09 lbs

Heaviest Blue Crab – Zachary Shoemaker with a Crab of 0.92 lbs.
Largest Sand / Gulf Trout – Alyssa Walker with a fish weighing in at 0.85 lbs.
Redfish with the Most Spots – had no entries
Heavy Stinger – Alex Lima with a stringer weighing in at 25.41 lbs.

Back by Popular Demand – Mini Tournaments with fish in both Adult and Youth Division in Competition
Friday, October 3 – Speckled Trout – Jacob Galloway with a fish weighing in at 2.58 lbs.
Saturday, October 4 – Redfish – Warren Knight with a fish weighing in at 7.42 lbs.
Sunday, October 5 – Flounder – Kathy Perkins with a fish weighing in at 2.80 lbs.

River’s End Volunteer Fire Dept. sincerely thanks all of the sponsors, and all participants of the tourney, whether they took home an award or not – they are all winners in our book! The event would not have been a success without your participation. For pictures of the event visit: http://www.revfd.com

Posted in General saltwater fishing | Comments Off on RESULTS FOR THE 18TH ANNUAL RIVERS END VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPT. FISHING TOURNAMENT