18th Annual River’s End Volunteer Fire Dept. Fishing Tournament

18th Annual River’s End Volunteer Fire Dept. Fishing Tournament Set to Reel in Fun, Fish, and Funds

River’s End Volunteer Fire Dept. will host the 18th annual fishing tournament and fund raiser on the first full weekend of October (Oct. 3 – 5). The tournament begins at 12:01 a.m., Friday, October 3, and runs through 2 p.m., Sunday, October 5th when final weights will be tallied and prizes awarded. Fish can be caught anywhere in public waters, but must be weighed in at the River’s End Volunteer Fire Dept. Station at 12070 F.M. 2918. Weigh in hours will be from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday (Oct. 3 and 4), and 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Sunday (Oct. 5).

This year marks the 41st anniversary of the founding of River’s End VFD and all proceeds from this tournament go toward obtaining an automatic external defibrillator (AED) for Station I and reskinning Station II. We are also actively seeking fish sponsors ($10.00 and up), and donations of live and silent auction items.

Again this year, R.E.V.F.D. is offering daily mini tournaments that all divisions can compete in. Friday, October 3rd’s mini-tournament is for Speckled Trout and special weigh-in hours for this mini-tournament will be 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. Saturday’s mini-tournament is for Redfish with the same special weigh-in hours as Speckled Trout. Sunday, October 6th’s mini-tournament is for Flounder with special weigh-in hours of 8 a.m. – noon. Fish entered in the daily mini-tournaments can also be weighed in for the larger tournament. The prizes for the mini-tournaments are plaques and bragging rights.

You may pick up tournament applications and purchase event t-shirts, raffle and meal tickets at Bernard Grocery on F.M. 2611 at the Churchill Bridge the weekend of September 26-27, or Stewart’s Grocery (in Brazoria) Saturday, September 27 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. T-shirts will be given to all paid entrants or can be purchased for $15.00 at the local stores mentioned above on the same weekend. Again this year, you may also download entry forms, register, or register and pay online at www.revfd.com .

The Adult Division of the tournament ($35.00 entry fee) consists of 4 categories: Redfish, Speckled Trout, Flounder, and Croaker. First, second, and third place prizes will be awarded for each category. First place for all categories will be $100.00 and a plaque. Second place winners will receive $50.00 and a plaque, and third place winners will receive $25.00 and a plaque. There will also be a $100.00 prize and plaque for the Redfish with the most spots and the heaviest stringer. This stringer must contain at least one each of Speckled Trout, Redfish and Flounder, but cannot have more than 5 fish total. Only Redfish between 20” – 27” may be entered in any category.

The 16 and Under Division ($25.00 registration fee) is designed to encourage more youngsters to fish. This division also consists of 4 main categories: Redfish, Speckled Trout, Flounder and Croaker. First place winners in all the above categories will take home a $50.00 gift certificate and a plaque; second place takes home a $25.00 gift certificate and a plaque; and third place takes home a $10.00 gift certificate and a plaque. Again this year the Youth Heaviest Stringer winner will take home a $50.00 gift certificate and a plaque. The rules for the Youth Heaviest Stringer have changed to make it easier for the young anglers to win and includes up to 5 of ANY legal fish (this includes fish outside of the four categories, but the largest Redfish entered can only be 27” long). In addition to those 13 prize winning places, the R.E.V.F.D. has added 4 more “fun” categories for our youth. Plaques will be awarded for the following “fun” categories: Redfish with the most spots, Largest Hardhead, Largest Blue Crab, and Largest Sand / Gulf Trout.

If you don’t fish, but you would still like to support the fire department, you can come for the Saturday, October 4 or Sunday, October 5 events. Starting at 11 a.m. Saturday until 7 p.m., October 4, Luckenbach Sausage on a stick, Coney Islands or Frito Pies will be available for a $5.00 donation. In addition, a silent auction has been added from 11 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

On Sunday, October 5, awards will be presented to the tournament winners starting around 3:00 p.m. Raffle drawings will also be held for a 20’ tapered aluminum flag pole with a 3’ x 5’ flag (donated by 2 J’s Café and Marina), a custom silver jig head with emerald eyes (donated by Kenzie & Co.), a custom made rod and reel (donated by Billy Huett), and a $400.00 Walmart Gift Certificate. Raffle tickets are available for $5.00 each or 5 for $20.00. Winners need not be present to win. The annual live auction (maximum 6 items) has been moved to Sunday, October 5 to take place while final tallies for the awards presentation are taking place (2 p.m.).

Tournament applications are available upon request by contacting Roy Edwards at 979-964-4332, or Tracy Woodall at 979-482-4626, or by downloading them from www.revfd.com . You may also register and pay online. Please note you must be a paid entrant before you start fishing for the tournament.

In case of a severe storm, the tournament will take place 2 weeks later (the weekend of October 17 – 19). Please contact Roy Edwards or Tracy Woodall at the above phone numbers if changes to these plans become necessary. We’ll see you at the end of the river.

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HANDGUN HUNTING – BACK TO BASICS, SORTA, PART ONE

A lot of my handgun hunting preparations and efforts lately have been in the area of semi-auto pistols – because I think serious hunting semi-autos are a fairly new field and an interesting option. This does not mean I have sold all my Thompson Contender single shots, nor did I entirely forsake my revolvers. I had owned a Ruger Super Blackhawk in .44 magnum for several years, but never really hunted with it (although it did ride on my hip during many visits to the woods as a “back-up”). When testing the .460 Roland version of the 1911 semi-auto which is designed to give a semi-auto the power of a .44 mag, and with less recoil, I felt I should take the Ruger out for a shoot to compare the two guns.

My .460 is on a Springfield Mil Spec frame, and the trigger is a bit rough, so the Ruger came out on top in this category with its excellent trigger pull. I did feel that the Ruger had more recoil with factory loaded 240gr JHP ammo than the .460 did firing 230 gr JHP’s loaded by Georgia Arms, but the revolver did not have quite the earth-quaking muzzle blast of the .460 with the compensator on the barrel (of course, the comp is why the recoil was less!).

As might be expected when evaluating a single action revolver against a converted 1911, the revolver has to win in strength and reliability, right? Well …, on about the 3rd or 4th shot through the Ruger, the cylinder locked up and put me out of business! To get it unlocked required removing the cylinder from the frame and re-installing, and that (without shooting, of course) only lasted momentarily. Stumped, I took my Ruger and its sterling reputation for being one of the strongest actions on the market to a local gun smith, who found that one chamber seemed cracked. His evaluation was that either I had fed it a vastly over-powered hand load, or it had been dropped on a hard surface, like concrete.

I was, in fact, shooting hand loads when this problem arose, but… I am a careful hand loader, weigh each charge on a digital scale after taking it from my Hornady powder dispenser/scale. It is possible I could have over charged a round,but I don’t think so. A more likely solution was that I had fired a round with bullet set back causing over pressure. I watch for this carefully with my semi’s – even with factory loads – and also on the sub-sonic ammo I load for my suppressed .44, and use a Lee Factory Crimp Die in an effort to make sure my bullets are snug and do not get set back in the magazine while firing several rounds ahead of them. Still, this could have happened, and the rounds I was shooting that day had been in loops on the pistol belt for some time. I had noticed that some were hard to remove from the loops, so I might have put too much push on a bullet that was not as tight as it should have been and pushed it back towards the powder charge? Even Elmer Keith warned against this in his book “Sixgun”. Note to self: remove bullets from the belt after each trip in the future.

As to the gun being dropped, I don’t remember doing that, but I got it used, so it could have happened before I became the care-taker of this arm. I honestly haven’t shot it enough to rule this out. The ‘smith cleaned up the damaged chamber enough to allow the cylinder to rotate and told me I might use it as is, but only as a five-shooter – keeping a piece of empty brass or a snap cap in the damaged one to insure I didn’t try to use it.

My choice was to replace the cylinder. Problem was, no retailers of revolver parts seemed to carry replacement cylinders for Rugers. A call to Ruger Customer Service revealed that they do not sell cylinders as parts, because they want them to be fitted at their factory, by their personnel. OK, I need a cylinder, so if those are the rules, I’ll go by them and send the gun in. When arranging this, I asked if I could have an unfluted, stainless steel cylinder put in, if I paid for any extra charge. The answer was that Ruger does not have a “custom shop” so they would not do this unless a stainless cylinder was the only one available. Darn!

I shipped the revolver back to Ruger for a (plain-jane) replacement cylinder. This is legal for me to do without an FFL, and I can also receive it back directly from Ruger, because it was being sent in for repair. A couple of days later, I got a call saying Ruger would NOT repair my SBH, because the frame also seemed to be cracked, and in their opinion it was not safe to repair and fire. The Customer Service lady did, however, offer me a new SBH at a price well below retail price. I agreed to this, and was told it might be several weeks before I could get my new gun, as they would have to wait until it was made. My counter offer was to pay any extra charge for a full stainless gun, but this was not happening, either. Also, since this would be a new, untitled so to speak, revolver, it could not be shipped directly to me, but had to be received by an FFL holder. My son qualifies for this, but the local gun shop in Lake Jackson – Gulf Coast Tactical Supply, is much closer than his location in Nederland, and they have been good about receiving hand guns for me in the past.

While I waited for the new Ruger to come in, I read all I could about the company and their products, and found that I might be in rare company as one of the few people able to actually “break” a Ruger Super Blackhawk! These pistols are so strong that loading manuals keep separate load data for .45 Long Colt and .44 Magnum that are suggested for “Ruger and Contender Only”, because “lesser” hand guns cannot be safely fired with them. Generally, I feel that if something CAN be broken then I can do it, but I will certainly be more careful with the new one, as there would be no one else to “blame” if this one breaks!

Although I still need to shoot a few hogs with my 10mm and .460 Rowland semi-autos, the new Ruger will be in the mix now, also. For that use, I ordered the Weaver 301 scope mount and fitted a T/C 2.5 x 7 variable scope to it. I originally mounted a Weaver 2x scope, but my wife and a friend did not think the sliver scope looked proper on a blued hand gun. Of course, I still had not given up hope for a stainless gun, or cylinder! The T/C scope, though, has nearly as much field of view as the Weaver – with the option for a higher power at the twist of a wrist. I also has a (red) lighted reticle which should be handy for early morning, late evening shots. After mounting it in a set of good, 4 screw rings, I have to admit it is pretty handsome.

I thought the silver scope looked good on the Ruger, but bowed to peer pressure and replaced it with a blued tube.

I thought the silver scope looked good on the Ruger, but bowed to peer pressure and replaced it with a blued tube.

This T/C 2.5 x 7 power variable scope in blued finish was judged a better match for the Ruger SBH.

This T/C 2.5 x 7 power variable scope in blued finish was judged a better match for the Ruger SBH.

My last Ruger had factory Rosewood grips, this one seems to have maybe walnut “handles” as the color is much darker. The right hand side one is actually well figured and pretty handsome, but the one on the left is much darker. Rather than having mismatched grips, I am looking a a custom pair from Cary at CLCCustom Grips. He offers an amazing variety of woods and stunning workmanship, and as soon as I make up my mind between Honey Mesquite and Spaulted Maple, I intend to order a set. He had a pair – sold – on his website made of Lacewood that were VERY nice, but Lacewood is not featured among all the blank grips he has displayed. I used some Lacewood on my old 31 Bertram for fancy trimmings, and found it an extremely hard wood which should make excellent grips IF it were available. Thought I might have saved a piece, but can’t seem to find any, so Mesquite it is, maybe. When I can make up my mind – and wait for them to be made, I’ll report back on them.

Now, for ammo for the new gun. My experience with loading sub sonic ammo for the .44 have shown that a 335gr Hard Cast bullet launched at 1050 or so feet per second will penetrate fully through even a big hog, or through 2 smaller ones. Other guys with more hand gun hunting and loading experience have told me that a heavy-for-caliber bullet at 1000- 1100 fps from a .44 or a .45 LC will kill critters up to Moose, and do not punish the gun – or the shooter – as much. With this in mind, I have loaded up quite a few rounds that should be in this velocity range with Sierra Jacketed Soft Nose and Nosler Jacketed Hollow Points in 300 gr weight. If this velocity proves to be too “slow” for jacketed bullets, I might goose it up a little. The Ruger should easily take the extra strain, and I’ve been shooting .44 magnum handguns of one type or another for a couple of decades.

When the rain stops long enough, I have some shooting to do over the chronograph with the 10mm Glock and the .460 1911 to accompany articles I have already committed to, but then the Ruger will step up to the plate. I’ll be posting results of various loads, scope evaluation, and also a handy holster I have found for scoped revolvers.

Ruger SBH Part two:

When it rains,, it truly does pour! My “new” Ruger SBH seems to have arrived flawed! Noticed before even firing it that something was wrong with the cylinder timing. If I open the loading gate as if to load rounds, then rotate the cylinder slightly counter clockwise until it stops in between two cylinder flutes as recommended to avoid getting scratches on the cylinder, and the close the gate, instead of locking up tight – as my older New Model Blackhawk does, it will still rotate about another flute’s worth on the cylinder. It does stop at this point, but will go back forward the same distance – nor= locking up as it is supposed to. If the gun is cocked, however, the cylinder locks solidly in position with the barrel, so I don’t think it is unsafe to fire, just poor finish quality for a new revolver. Ruger Customer Service has been contacted a half dozen times about this, now don’t even reply – much less offer a solution (such as sending the gun back?). I found that there was a “groove” under the top frame portion that looked like a tool mark that did not get polished out that could be causing at least some of the problem – but since Ruger no longer “talks” to me, I cannot get an opinion from them about it. Since I seem to have no other option right now, I guess I’ll just keep the thing and not let anyone else handle it, so they don’t see my shame in having such a poorly fitted Ruger. I almost wonder if maybe when their Customer Service offered me such a cheap price on a “new” gun, they fully intended to send me one that was flawed and could not be sold for full price in a retail store? I know that had I been shopping for a new Ruger and handled this one, it would have gone back to the counter while I looked for another that functioned properly – which would be my recommendation for other potential buyers.

More “work” with the Ruger, and it still is not “right”. Seems as though the cylinder is not lining up correctly, as if I put pressure on it to force it further down in the frame opening, SO THAT THE PROJECTION THAT IS SUPPOSED TO CATCH IN THE BOLT CUT IN THE CYLINDER AND HOLD IT LOCKED UP TIGHT – catches better, it seems to lock properly. To that end, next i am going to replace the cylinder/belt pin with one from Belt Mountain that is designed to fit better and eliminate the possibility of the pin working loose and falling or “shooting” out as the pin on my first .44 magnum – an old Herter’s with a 4″ barrel that really had a recoil problem – began to do before I got rid of it (actually lost the pin while shooting). The replacement pin should fit tighter, which I am hoping will encourage proper cylinder alignment. More on this when I get the pin.

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WEAVER NO-DRILL SCOPE MOUNT FOR RUGER SUPPER BLACKHAWK REVOLVER

The Weaver 301 Scope mount for the Ruger SBH requires no drilling or tapping.

The Weaver 301 Scope mount for the Ruger SBH requires no drilling or tapping.

There are more “No-drill” scope mounting options these days than ever, some good, some not so good. In my opinion, this offering from the well-respected (and Texas based) optics firm Weaver goes in the “good” column. On a Ruger Super Blackhawk, like the .44 mag version shown, there are really only two screws required to secure the mount. One goes in the hole in the top of the receiver where the original rear sight was secured – you do need to remove that sight before installing the mount – and the other secures a barrel yoke which fits around the barrel just in front of the receiver to the mount. The barrel yoke screw is of large diameter and should be strong enough to withstand the recoil from a full-charge .44 magnum. Installing the mount is a very simple process, and adding Weaver scope rings is just as easy – they slide on the rail and secure for location in the two slots on the mount.

The scope pictured is a 2.5 x 7 variable, which accounts for its length and is well positioned with the front lens of the scope far enough back from the muzzle to avoid getting heat and/or smoke on the lens. The picture shows the position of the mount on the receiver. Note that when on the gun is is actually “upside down” from the picture in the Amazon ad.

As this mount base was designed and sold by Weaver, I have no qualms about using it on a heavy caliber revolver – and it is much faster and more economical than having a gun smith drill and tap your revolver. Also, most “experts” seem to feel having the scope atop the receiver is a better position than 0n the barrel, as some mounts place it.

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THE CUSTOM REVOLVER – HAMILTON S. BOWEN

This is not a book written by someone who admires custom revolvers – although Mr. Bowen obviously falls into that category. Hamilton Bowen is one of the foremost gunsmiths specializing in this business. He writes of what exactly a custom revolver is, what steps are involved in getting there, which handguns best lend themselves to this sort of work, and which modifications are best suited to each of them. He deals with both single and double action revolvers from the leading manufacturers. While his business is geared largely to custom big bore revolvers, he also details conversions to older cartridges and non-traditional conversions. Whether you prefer Ruger, Colt, Smith& Wesson and some other brand, Mr. Bowen will tell you what can be done to improve or individualize your handgun – and possibly increase the value at the same time. As a Ruger owner, I have discovered that Ruger has no in-house custom shop, so Ruger owners must turn to a custom gunsmith for just about anything not in the standard catalogue. There is a lot of very useful and interesting information in this book, as well as photographs of some beautiful revolvers and the steps taken to make them that way. There is also some history of the modern revolver.

Mr. Bowen, who is also an attorney by training, is a very good and entertaining writer, with a very keen sense of humor and a sharp wit. Throughout the book he uses “turns” of phrase that should bring chuckles from the reader.

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THE GUN DIGEST BOOK OF RUGER REVOLVERS, by MAX PRASAC

Max Prasac is a leading authority on big bore revolvers, and in this book he thoroughly examines Ruger revolvers, from the smaller models meant for self defense to the “big boys” meant for serious hunting. Both single action Blackhawks and double action Redhawks are examined in detail, as well as custom Ruger revolvers, hunting with Ruger revolvers, and a lot of background into the company’s history and production practices. As a Ruger owner, I am happy to have the information in this book available, and if you admire Rugers, you will be, too!

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THE RIFLEMAN’S RIFLE, by RODGER C. RULE

Anyone who REALLY loves Model 70 Winchester bolt action rifles – and there are a bunch of us – should have a copy of this book. It was out of print for some time, but now is back, although not at a bargain basement price. And don’t look for a deal on the used market, those older copies are collector’s items in themselves. This 368 page work (including index” is NOT light reading, but a detailed reference volume on the Model 70 as produced from 1936 to 1963. It contains not just text, but photos for ID of various types and years of model 70’s, history, drawings, and specifications. There is nowhere else to get this information, all between two covers. As a writer myself, I cannot imagine the time and effort that went into producing this book. You don’t have to be a collector of Model 70’s to treasure this volume. Although primarily focused on “Pre-64” rifles, there is also some information on later models. Within these pages you can search for year of production and how many rifles were made in that year by serial number. It also displays some of the rarest and finest Model 70’s ever made.

I got my copy several years ago, when they first returned to print, and the price has increased quite a bit since then – but availability should now be better, and the wait time shorter.

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Dr. Bob Ship On Red Snapper

Here is a link to an interview with Dr. Bob Ship, possibly the single best “expert” on red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico alive. I will let Dr. Ship tell his own story:

http://www.nola.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2014/08/gulf_fishing_authority_says_re.html

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18TH ANNUAL RIVER’S END (SAN BERNARD) VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPT. FISHING TOURNAMENT/FUND RAISER

18th Annual River’s End Volunteer Fire Dept. Fishing Tournament / Fund Raiser Set

Ed. Note: This tournament will be held on the San Bernard River, and participating is a fun way to support a worthy cause, while at the same time seeing for yourself what is happening to the San Bernard River – still. Info submitted by Jan Edwards.

River’s End Volunteer Fire Dept. will host the 18th annual fishing tournament and fund raiser on the first full weekend of October (Oct. 3 – 5). The tournament begins at 12:01 a.m., Friday, October 3, and runs through 2 p.m., Sunday, October 5th when final weights will be tallied and prizes awarded. Fish can be caught anywhere in public waters, but must be weighed in at the River’s End Volunteer Fire Dept. Station at 12070 F.M. 2918. Weigh in hours will be from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday (Oct. 3 and 4), and 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Sunday (Oct. 5).

This year marks the 41st anniversary of the founding of River’s End VFD and all proceeds from this tournament go toward obtaining an automatic external defibrillator (AED) for Station I and reskinning Station II. We are also actively seeking fish sponsors ($10.00 and up), and donations of live and silent auction items.

The Adult Division of the tournament ($35.00 entry fee) consists of 4 categories: Redfish, Speckled Trout, Flounder, and Croaker. First, second, and third place prizes will be awarded for each category. First place for all categories will be $100.00 and a plaque. Second place winners will $50.00 and a plaque, and third place winners will receive $25.00 and a plaque. There will also be a $100.00 prize and plaque for the Redfish with the most spots and the heaviest stringer. This stringer must contain at least one each of Speckled Trout, Redfish and Flounder, but cannot have more than 5 fish total. Note: Only Redfish between 20” and 27” will be accepted in any category – Adult or 16 and Under.

The 16 and Under Division ($25.00 registration fee) is designed to encourage more youngsters to fish. This division also consists of 4 main categories: Redfish, Speckled Trout, Flounder and Croaker. First place winners in all the above categories will take home a $50.00 gift certificate and a plaque; second place takes home a $25.00 gift certificate and a plaque; and third place takes home a $10.00 gift certificate and a plaque. In addition to those 12 prize winning places, there are 4 more “fun” categories for our youth. Plaques will be awarded for the following “fun” categories: Redfish with the Most Spots, Largest Hardhead, Largest Blue Crab, and Largest Sand / Gulf Trout. Again, this year, there will be a Youth Heaviest Stringer award with a $50.00 gift card and plaque for the prize. Again this year, only for the 16 and Under division, the prize will be awarded to the heaviest stringer of any inshore fish (up to 5 legally caught per TP&W regulations).

Again this year are daily mini-tournaments which earn winning anglers bragging rights and a plaque for each daily winning fish. Dates, eligible fish and weigh-in times for the mini-tournaments are as follows:

Date:
Eligible Fish
Weigh-in times
Friday, October 3, 2014
Speckled Trout
9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Saturday, October 4, 2014
Redfish
9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, October 5, 2014
Flounder
8 a.m. – noon
Please note the weigh-in times differ from the main tournament weigh-in hours.

If you don’t fish, but you would still like to support the fire department, you can come for the Saturday, October 4 or Sunday, October 5 events. Starting at 11 a.m. Saturday until 7 p.m., October 4, Luckenbach Sausage on a stick, Coney Islands or Frito Pies will be available for a $5.00 donation. A silent auction will run from 11 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. for the community’s convenience.

On Sunday, October 5, awards will be presented to the tournament winners starting around 3:00 p.m. After the close of the weigh station, while we are waiting for awards results, a live auction with no more than 6 items will take place. Raffle drawings will also be held for a 20’ tapered aluminum flag pole with a 3’ x 5’ flag (donated by Rick Gardner and 2 J’s Café and Marina), a custom silver jig head with mystery eyes (donated by Kenzie & Co.), a custom made rod and reel (donated by Billy Huett), and a $400.00 Walmart Gift Certificate sponsored by community donations. Raffle tickets are available for $5.00 each or 5 for $20.00. Winners need not be present to win.

You may pick up tournament applications and purchase t-shirts, raffle and meal tickets at Bernard Grocery on F.M. 2611 at the Churchill Bridge the weekends of September 12-13, 19 – 20 and 26 – 27 or Stewart’s Grocery (in Brazoria) Saturday, September 27 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. A free t-shirt will be given to each paid entrant. You may also register and pay online with PayPal at www.revfd.com .

Tournament applications are available upon request by contacting Roy Edwards at 979-964-4332, or Tracy Woodall at 979-482-4626, or by downloading them from www.revfd.com . You may also register and pay online. Please note you must be a paid entrant before you start fishing for the tournament.

In case of a severe storm, the tournament will take place 2 weeks later (the weekend of October 17 – 19). Please contact Roy Edwards or Tracy Woodall at the above phone numbers if changes to these plans become necessary. Bring your fishing rod and tackle box and we’ll see you at the end of the river.

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Teaching Bad Habits!

This momma coon is teaching her kiddos to steal from deer feeders. - a sometimes fatal habit.

This momma coon is teaching her kiddos to steal from deer feeders. – a sometimes fatal habit.

Some youngsters really DO seem born to a life of crime. Seems family and surroundings can help to “lead them astray”.

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PUBLIC COMMENT MEETINGS ON REEF FISH AMENDMENT 40 – SECTOR SEPARATION

The Gulf Council will be holding Public Comment meetings in several Gulf of Mexico port citied on the proposed Reef Fish Amendment 40, which would create Sector Separation in the recreational red snapper fishing industry. This move would divide the current recreational quota of red snapper into two new quotas, one for purely recreational fishermen, the other for recreational-for-hire (charter and head boat) fishing. Proponents are mostly from the for-hire sector, and they feel such a division would allow them more time to fish, and possibly more fish to catch. Others weighing in on the subject feel it would just lead to further division among those fishing for red snapper.

Meetings in Texas will be held:

August 4, 2014 – Galveston – Galveston Hilton Hotel

August 5, 2014 – Port Aransas – Plantation Suites and Conference Center

All meetings begin at 6PM and end at 9PM.

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