Suppressing the Glock 23, .40 S&W

Changing these pistons allows this suppressor to be used on a Glock .40 S&W barrel, instead of a .45 auto.

Changing these pistons allows this suppressor to be used on a Glock .40 S&W barrel, instead of a .45 auto.

The intro to this post is in the post – “Suppressor Do’s and Don’ts” , where I describe buying a Glock 23 in .40 S&W with a threaded barrel to use in testing a Ti-Rant M45 suppressor meant for the .45 auto cartridge. My enthusiasm for this segment of suppressor testing began to wane a bit, when I discovered that Glock uses metric thread pitches on their factory threaded barrels. After a LOT of discussion with various folks in the industry, I found that the Ti-Rant suppressor would fit the Glock threads – and those on Sigs and HK’s – but only if the standard booster piston were replaced with one threaded M14.5 x 1 LH. My “normal” supplier was out of these pistons, so I bought one from Midway USA, and had it overnighted to me. Changing the pistons out was not especially difficult once I discovered how to do it, and the new piston fit in just right – AND it now screws on to the Glock threaded barrel!

By the way, for other common calibers on Glock factory threaded barrels, the thread pitch is:

9 mm – 13.5 x 1 LH

.45 – 16 x 1 LH

First step in switching calibers is to remove the booster from the suppressor, by unscrewing the end cap.

First step in switching calibers is to remove the booster from the suppressor, by unscrewing the end cap.

The booster section of most CF pistol suppressors is internal, and consists of a booster spring around a caliber specific piston in a screw in housing.

The booster section of most CF pistol suppressors is internal, and consists of a booster spring around a caliber specific piston in a screw in housing.

Booster section of the Ti-Rant completely removed and disassembled.

Booster section of the Ti-Rant completely removed and disassembled.

The Glock 23 in .40 S&W is used by the FBI and many other law enforcement agencies.

The Glock 23 in .40 S&W is used by the FBI and many other law enforcement agencies.

Once the proper booster piston was in the Ti-Rant .45 auto "can", it screwed up fine to the Glock barrel.

Once the proper booster piston was in the Ti-Rant .45 auto “can”, it screwed up fine to the Glock barrel.

Although this suppressor is long for a pistol the size of the Glock, because it is light, it handles and points well.

Although this suppressor is long for a pistol the size of the Glock, because it is light, it handles and points well.

When I headed for my woods property “range” to test fire this combo, I had a box of Winchester SXZ “Personal Protection ammo, loaded with 180 gr Jacketed Hollow Point bullets. Although I have seen lighter bullets advertised as being loaded to a muzzle velocity of 2000 fps in .40 S&W, most of the 180 gr loads are actually sub sonic – mostly less than 900 fps. I have suppressor sights for this pistol, just haven’t mounted them yet, so I was shooting for sound, mostly – although just “aiming” down the suppressor produced accuracy at 15 yards that would be suitable for home defense.

Recoil with this pistol/ammo combo is a little snappy, but not much. It was less with the can on, than without, and I would think that the extra weight of the suppressor helped with that some – except it weighs hardly anything! Of course, another advantage to suppressors is that they DO reduce recoil. Even though this one is much larger than the .22 LR can I’ve also been testing, it is lighter – and on the tupper ware Glock is a lighter setup than my Ruger .22 LR + suppressor.

Although the suppressed Glock is longer overall, it is actually much lighter than the suppressed Ruger .22 LR.

Although the suppressed Glock is longer overall, it is actually much lighter than the suppressed Ruger .22 LR.

Although it might be challenging to find a good holster for this rig, I think it would make a great woods-walking set-up, quiet enough to use for stealthy snake protection or pest control, yet having enough power to take down a hog – or deer – at close range, with a well placed shot. Personally, I have been lucky and never had to shoot a deer more than once, but many years ago a good friend got pretty beat up trying to cut a wounded buck’s throat with a pocket knife, rather than shoot it again. Having this suppressed .40 S&W Glock in the stand would be a much easier and humane way to “finish off” game – and in the long run, probably quieter than a knife!

Of course, as a home defense gun, the suppressed semi-auto .40 – especially with a high cap magazine, and Glock offers a factory mag with a capacity of 22 rounds for the G23 – would offer lots of firepower, and a lot less hearing damage, were it’s “help” ever needed!

In the future, I may very well obtain a 9 mm barrel for this Glock, to be able to use it as a “test” platform for that caliber, suppressed, also.

Thanks to The Silencer Shop in Austin, Texas – www.silensershop.com, 512/931-4556, and the Bowers Group of Cornelius, Oregon – www.bowersgroup.com, 503/992-8697 – for all their help with this project.

About MikeH

Texas hunter and fisherman for 50 years, published outdoor writer since 1979, licensed charter boat operator from 1982 to 2013. Past Member, Board of Directors, National Association of Charterboat Operators, current member Environmental Advisory Committee to the DOE and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Married to Dorothy since 2000, one son, Michael who is recently married and living in Nederland, Texas. My wife and I live in Oyster Creek, Texas, near Freeport, and have a hunting property outside of Brazoria, Texas.
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2 Responses to Suppressing the Glock 23, .40 S&W

  1. Mike Iversen says:

    Mike,

    Nice to see your progress. I had no idea that the OEM Glock barrel would a problem with the pitch. Live and learn. Yes, the Glock is a Gen 3.

  2. MikeH says:

    Thanks, Mike. I’m still NOT a Glock fan, but the G23 is a nice pistol, and the .40 S&W us an interesting cartridge. It was good – for me – to learn about the differences in threads used on barrels of “European guns”. This is something a lot of potential buyers don’t think enough about. I am just starting my next project – suppressing a Sig P220 in .45 ACP, and Sig uses YET ANOTHER metric thread size. Of course, the people who make and sell suppressors are “on top of this”, and most can provide booster pistons in about any thread size/type that are simple to change out. Suppressors are becoming so popular now, as a matter of fact, that Midway and Brownell’s stock such parts. “Armed” with this knowledge, a suppressor such as the Ti-Rant 45 I am currently testing can be used for pistols in .45, .44, .40, and 9mm calibers – and can be had with threading to fit standard and metric threads to accomodate Glock, Sig, FN, and other “foreign” pistols, as well, as those “made in America”. (Yes, I know Glocks are now stamped as being made in the US, as are Sigs).

    Mike

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