Uberti Cattleman .45 Colt

After finding my Herters .44 magnum, I remembered why I liked the “Old Model” action of the Colts and Old Model Rugers, where cocking the hammer to half-cock allows the cylinder to rotate for loading rounds or removing fired cases. Not as “safe”, certainly, but it does have a certain charm of its own. I have been searching for a good Old Model Ruger, but so far in vain. Instead, I found a very nice Uberti Colt clone in .45 Colt. This handgun is smaller than my Rugers, but nicely made, with a brass grip frame and color case hardened cylinder frame and well blued cylinder and barrel. The grips are walnut, and one piece, with no grip screws – which I really like – and well fitted and finished. If they ever need to be removed, the grip frame must be detached from the revolver first. True to the theme, sights are minimal, and my only complaint as a shooter is that the front sight blade is VERY narrow.

The Uberti guns are made in Italy, where Clint Eastwood's spaghetti westerns spawned much interest in guns of the American west.  They are accurate clones of the Colt Single Action Army revolver.

The Uberti guns are made in Italy, where Clint Eastwood’s spaghetti westerns spawned much interest in guns of the American west. They are accurate clones of the Colt Single Action Army revolver.

Uberti makes many other variations on the basic Colt theme, including one with a “charcoal blue” barrel and cylinder which I find VERY attractive. Overall, this gun is smaller than even my .44 Special Ruger, and with a 4.5″ barrel, would actually be a decent concealed carry gun.

The Uberti .45 Colt is smaller even than my .44 Special Ruger flattop Blackhawk (bottom), and considerably smaller than my .45 Colt Blackhawk (top)

The Uberti .45 Colt is smaller even than my .44 Special Ruger flattop Blackhawk (bottom), and considerably smaller than my .45 Colt Blackhawk (top)

The Uberti is definitely an attractive revolver, one made with a nod to nostalgia and American firearms heritage.

The Uberti is definitely an attractive revolver, one made with a nod to nostalgia and American firearms heritage.

The Uberti .45 Colt is certainly small compared to my heavy framed Herters .44 magnum!

The Uberti .45 Colt is certainly small compared to my heavy framed Herters .44 magnum!

While this revolver seems well made, and of “modern” materials, it is not the choice for firing the “hot” .45 Colt loads that some hand gunners push to near .454 Casull pressures and velocities. Mine came with a box of Sig factory loads, firing 230 gr hollow points at 825 fps, but I think these might be close to the upper limit for this gun. For now I am shooting hand loads I worked up with 200 gr cast lead bullets really intended for .45 ACP, at 750 – 800 fps. These shoot very well, with light recoil, and have so for been pretty accurate at 15 feet or so. I happily discovered that I not only had a box of these bullets in my stash, but also two boxes of 230 gr Hornady XTP hollow points and a box of 200 gr XTP’s – so I think the Uberti and I are going to have a lot of fun in the near future!

About MikeH

Texas hunter and fisherman for 50 years, published outdoor writer since 1979, licensed charter boat operator from 1982 to 2013. Past Member, Board of Directors, National Association of Charterboat Operators, current member Environmental Advisory Committee to the DOE and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Married to Dorothy since 2000, one son, Michael who is recently married and living in Nederland, Texas. My wife and I live in Oyster Creek, Texas, near Freeport, and have a hunting property outside of Brazoria, Texas.
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